Syllabus

Science Prerequisites for Health Professionals

BIOL 1020: Microbiology for the Health Professions

Credits - 3 (Lecture) and 1 (Lab)

Description

This course is designed to meet the microbiology prerequisite for students who are applying for admission to health profession programs. Most students taking this course will have an undergraduate degree and will be in the process of a career change. Online Microbiology is a one-semester course.  It will emphasize the concepts that are a necessary groundwork for courses the student will take in his/her professional program.

Topics covered in this course include: the history of microbiology, microbial morphology and physiology, bacterial metabolism, genetics, ecology, and the classification of microorganisms, particularly bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Therapeutic agents used to disrupt and control microbial growth are considered and a body systems approach is utilized in the coverage of diseases.   

Materials

Textbook

  • Microbiology: A Human Perspective
    Eugene W. Nester et.al., 10th edition

Note : The e-book version of Nester may not be used on any proctored course exam. Textbooks need to be purchased separately and are not part of your registration fee. All course materials are available through our bookstore.

Official UNE External Webcam and whiteboard* – To be used during proctored exams

You must show your proctor that your whiteboard is clear at the beginning of your testing session, and you must erase your whiteboard in front of the proctor before disconnecting from your session.  If you do not do this, your exam will not be credited.

These exams are closed for review. You will not be able to review this exam at any time. Please contact your instructor for specific feedback.

Laboratory Components

It is mandatory for students enrolled in the laboratory component of the course to order a lab kit.
The kit must be purchased directly through Hands-on Labs and cannot be purchased second-hand or from another vendor.

Students enrolled in lab must complete both parts of every lab – the assigned experiment and the corresponding assignment online – to earn a grade for the lab.

Learning Objectives and Outcomes

Learning Outcomes for Science Prerequisites for Health Professions Program

In lecture courses, students should be able to:

  1. Communicate scientific concepts and information clearly.
  2. Illustrate fundamental laws, theories, and principles of scientific disciplines.
  3. Apply knowledge and critical thinking skills to scientific problems.

In lab courses, students should be able to:

  1. Ask a question or define a problem that can be tested.
  2. Hypothesize possible result(s).
  3. Plan and/or conduct an investigation individually and/or collaboratively to produce data to serve as the basis for evidence.
  4. Analyze data using tools, technologies, and/or models (i.e. computational, mathematical, graphical, etc.) in order to make valid and reliable scientific claims or determine an optimal design solution.
  5. Communicate the results by constructing an explanation based on multiple pieces of valid and reliable evidence obtained from a variety of sources (including students’ own investigations, models, theories, simulations, peer review) and the assumption that theories and laws that describe the natural world operate today as they did in the past and will continue to do so in the future.
  6. Apply scientific ideas, principles, and/or evidence gained from various experiments, as well as other observations and/or research, to provide an explanation of phenomena and solve design problems, taking into account possible unanticipated effects.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of the course students will be able to:

  1. Define basic structure/function of microorganisms including prokaryotes, eukaryotes and viruses, with emphasis on their relationships to human disease and treatment modalities
  2. Describe the kinetics and patterns of microbial growth, and environmental factors that alter growth
  3. Describe key features of microbial genetics, including DNA structure and function, as well as mechanisms of DNA replication, transcription and translation
  4. Explain how and why microbial gene expression is regulated, as well as how genetic mutation and DNA transfer mechanisms affect microbial evolution, fitness and pathogenesis
  5. Define and compare beneficial versus pathogenic host-microbial interactions
  6. Explain fundamental stains, basic staining techniques, and corresponding bacterial and fungal morphology
  7. Describe the clinical manifestations associated with common bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic diseases
  8. Describe the uses of the various media and metabolic/enzymatic testing protocols
  9. Identify bacterial/fungal toxic and invasive factors and their relationship to the pathogenesis of disease
  10. Classify the mechanisms of antibiotic (antibacterial/antifungal), antiparasitic, and antiviral activity, as well as resistance strategies employed by target microorganisms
  11. Identify the pathogens commonly associated with infections of the skin, eyes, nervous system, respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract and genitourinary tract in humans, as well as their modes of pathogenesis and risk factors associated with each type of disease
  12. Identify common healthcare-associated (nosocomial) pathogens
  13. Identify disease and likely etiology on the basis of patient signs and symptoms, pertinent history, and lab findings
  14. Create a case study outline.

SELF PACED DESIGN

On the course start date, students will have access to orientation. This must be completed to be able to gain access to the first module in the course. Students must complete the first module to gain access to the next one. We recommend that students spend about 15 hours per week to complete a course in 16 weeks. When trying to complete the course in less than 16 weeks, we typically see students do this successfully within 12-14 weeks. Instructors will be timely in grading and feedback, but it will not be instant.

Assignments

Lectures and Laboratories

Our textbook allows students to utilize CONNECT from McGraw-Hill to go through the lecture course material with LearnSmart. This is a good self-assessment tool. The access code for CONNECT may be purchased using a link located within the course.


Laboratory Information:

For the laboratory portion of this course, you will be purchasing a LabPaq lab kit from the Hands-On Labs (HOL). For help ordering your HOL Kit, please follow the “Getting Started with Hands-On Labs” guide within the course.


Laboratory Assignments

For students enrolled in the laboratory component, most weeks have an associated laboratory assignment. Complete each assignment online using the HOL Online link provided by your instructor.

Using the HOL resource material, your notes, and in some cases outside research, answer all of the questions in each lab exercise. Your answers must be in the form of complete and grammatically correct sentences with proper spelling, grammar, and capitalization. Be mindful of the spelling for bacterial genus and species names (capitalize genus names, lower case for species names, eg., Streptococcus pyogenes). If a question is asking for terms you are not familiar with, be sure to define and understand those before you answer the question. Reference your facts using in-text citations and AMA format for your outside references.

Once you complete the lab, use the text submission field for this assignment within the course to write a message to your instructor to say that you have completed the assignment. This will serve as an alert to your instructor that your assignment is ready to be reviewed and graded.

For customer service concerns, please use the HOL dedicated phone line: (720)-360-4034

Chapter Tests, Vocabulary Quizzes, and Unit Exams

Chapter Tests

The chapter tests are multiple-choice and matching. The tests can be accessed by clicking on the link within the course. The chapter tests are open-book and are intended to help you review for the unit exams. They are timed and you have one single attempt at each test; the questions for each attempt cover the same material, although they may be different. Your course allows for a possible second and/or third attempt with quizzes/assignments. Please contact your course instructor if you wish to utilize another attempt. To prepare for the chapter tests, complete the readings, view the lecture material, and review using the CONNECT and other study helps posted in the chapter module. Also, review the end-of-chapter questions and other study aids in your textbook. When you are ready, take the test.

Module Vocabulary Quizzes

Each module has a 20-term vocabulary quiz. The terms are selected from the chapter vocabulary lists. The quizzes are taken online within the course learning management system. Each quiz is accessed by clicking on the link within the course. The quizzes are open book and are intended to help you review for the unit exams. To prepare for the vocabulary quizzes read through the lists of terms for each chapter within the module. Fit the terms into the context of the learning objectives for each chapter. The vocabulary quizzes are timed and you have one single attempt at each quiz. When you are ready, take the quiz. Your course allows for a possible second and/or third attempt with quizzes/assignments. Please contact your course instructor if you wish to utilize another attempt.

Unit exams

The five unit exams are timed exams (120 minutes) consisting of multiple choice and matching; with all questions graded automatically upon the completion of the unit exam.  These unit exams are single-attempt (with no pauses allowed during the 2-hour time frame) and may be taken only once. The unit exams will be available only after all the quizzes, tests and other assessments in the unit are completed. The exams will include topics covered in the textbook, learning objectives, and lectures for each unit. These exams are open notes and open book; however, you should review the material as though you will not have the notes or book available. There will not be time during the exam to look up every answer. Of the 5 unit exams, your 4 highest exams will count toward your final grade (the lowest score will be dropped). NOTE: Do not schedule your unit exams with ProctorU. Only the HOL Laboratory Final Exam (if you are taking the lab) and the lecture Final Exam need to be proctored.

The Microbiology Case Study

You will create a case study for a microbial infection selected from the current pathogen list which your instructor will provide to you. Your case study will be assembled using a detailed rubric. Upon completion, and by a specified due date (within Unit 5), your case study will be submitted within the course. Your course allows for a possible second and/or third attempt with quizzes/assignments. Please contact your course instructor if you wish to utilize another attempt.

Final Exam (Lecture)

You must purchase the Official UNE External Webcam to take your proctored examinations. Remember to order your webcam at least three weeks prior to scheduling your first proctored exam.

The cumulative BIOL 1020 lecture final is a proctored test so plan for at least a three-hour exam period consisting of multiple choice and short answer questions. It is closed book and closed notes. No electronic memory devices may be used, including but not limited to the internet, other files on a computer, cell phones, tablet devices, smartphones, e-books, etc.

You may use the Resource PDF on your exam by opening it in front of the proctor prior to starting the test. It must be a digital copy; no printed copies will be allowed. There are no exceptions to this policy. You are also permitted the use of a UNE-authorized whiteboard. You must show your proctor that your whiteboard is clear at the beginning of your testing session, and you must erase your whiteboard in front of the proctor before disconnecting from your session. If you do not do this, your exam will not be credited.

This exam is closed for review. You will not be able to review this exam at any time. Please contact your instructor for specific feedback.

For all exams, you must review the Proctored Examinations information and requirements in the Policies section of this syllabus.

HOL Laboratory Final Exam For Students Enrolled in the Laboratory 

The cumulative BIOL 1020 laboratory final is a proctored test. Plan for at least a three-hour exam period consisting of multiple choice, matching, and short answer questions. It is closed book and closed notes. No electronic memory devices may be used, including but not limited to the internet, other files on a computer, cell phones, tablet devices, smartphones, e-books, etc.

Take advantage of this list of Topics for Final Lab Exam Review.

This exam is closed for review. You will not be able to review this exam at any time. Please contact your instructor for specific feedback.

For all exams, you must review the Proctored Examinations information and requirements in the Policies section of this syllabus.

Discussion Board Posts

Discussion questions cover interesting current events or materials that contribute to a deeper understanding of key concepts and allow you to interact with your classmates and the instructor. Most of the discussion questions are designed to accompany particular chapters (see specific discussion questions for more information). Each question will require you to conduct internet research, read additional materials (a short journal or magazine article), visit a specific webpage, or view a short video. Then you will write a response following the guidelines in the assignment.

To earn full credit: you will need to post a response, respond to the original posts of at least two other students, and then contribute to an ongoing discussion. For special cases where one or two students are accelerating faster through the course, the instructor will participate in the discussion so that everyone has the opportunity to interact.

Discussion Question Guidelines

  1. Read the assignment carefully so that you are familiar with the materials that you need to cover and how to craft your post.
  2. Respect each other’s ideas, feelings, and experience. Some of the questions involve areas of disagreement. Expect your classmates to have different opinions.
  3. Use proper writing style. Correct spelling and sentence structure are expected just as if you were writing a regular paper. Use spell check and grammar check before you submit.
  4. Write your posting in a word document! That way you can save a copy and use spell check and grammar check.
  5. Cite the sources that you use to write your response. Follow the AMA guidelines.
  6. Avoid posting large blocks of text. Break your writing into paragraphs and use a space between paragraphs to make your posting easier to read online.
  7. Subscribe to the discussion so that you get email updates when there is activity.
  8. Use the “reply” button rather than the “compose” button when responding to someone else’s post.
  9. When responding to a classmate, address them by name.
  10. Do not use postings such as “I agree,” “I don’t know either,” or “ditto.” They do not add to the discussion, take up space on the Discussions, and will not be counted.
  11. Everyone benefits from an active discussion. Check back in frequently to see what others are saying.
  12. Plan your time carefully. You will need to give your classmates time to respond to your postings. This is an asynchronous class where students will be in different points of the class.
  13. Contact your instructor if there are schedule problems or other issues that need to be resolved.

Examinations and Grading Information

For students taking the lecture course only, the final course grade will be determined as follows:

Chapter Tests and Module Vocabulary Quizzes 10% of the final grade
5 Unit Exams (drop lowest score; 4 in total) 15% of the final grade
Final Exam 35% of the final grade
Case Study 25% of the final grade
Discussion Boards 15% of the final grade
Total Course Grade 100%

For students taking the lecture course with the laboratory, your final grade will be determined as follows:

Chapter Tests and Module Vocabulary Quizzes 10% of the lecture grade
5 Unit Exams (lowest score is dropped, 4 total) 15% of the lecture grade
Final Exam 35% of the lecture grade
Case Study 25% of the lecture grade
Discussion Boards 15% of the lecture grade
Total Lecture Weight in Final Grade 75%
12 Laboratory Exercise Assessments
50% of the laboratory grade
Lab Report 20% of the laboratory grade
HOL Laboratory Final Exam 30% of the laboratory grade
Total Lab Weight in the Final Grade 25%

 

Final Grade  
Lecture Grade 75% of Final Grade
Laboratory Grade 25% of Final Grade
Total Course Grade 100%

A letter grade is assigned according to the scheme below. The final course grade will not be posted until all the quizzes, tests, exams, and case study, are completed. For those students taking the laboratory, all lab exercise assessments, Lab Report, and the laboratory Final Exam must be also be submitted.

Grade Scale

Grade Points Grade Point Average (GPA)
A 94 – 100% 4.00
A- 90 – 93% 3.75
B+ 87 – 89% 3.50
B 84 – 86% 3.00
B- 80 – 83% 2.75
C+ 77 – 79% 2.50
C 74 – 76% 2.00
C- 70 – 73% 1.75
D 64 – 69% 1.00
F 00 – 63% 0.00

Schedule

Course Outline

Microbiology BIOL 1020
Lecture and Lab Schedule

Unit Module Lecture topic Textbook chapter HOL Laboratory Exercise
1. Life and Death of Microbes 1 Humans and the Microbial World 1 #1: Microbiology Laboratory Preparation

The Molecules of Life

(Note: There is no lecture or quiz for Chapter 2. You need to be familiar with the topics, but will not be asked specific questions from this chapter on the exam.)

2  
Microscopy and Prokaryotic Cell Structure 3  
2 Dynamics of Prokaryotic Growth 4 #2: Microscopy for Microbiology
Control of Prokaryotic Growth 5  
3 Metabolism: Fueling Cell Growth 6 #3: Aseptic Technique and Culturing Microbes

Review for and take the Unit I Exam

Complete your Unit 1 Discussion

 
2. Microbial Genetics and Diversity 4 DNA to Proteins 7 #4: Bacterial Enumeration – Dilutions and Plate Counts
Bacterial Genetics 8  
Biotechnology and Recombinant DNA 9  
5 Identification and Classification of Prokaryotic Organisms 10 #5: Bacterial Morphology and Staining Techniques
The Diversity of Prokaryotic Organisms 11  
The Eukaryotic Members of the Microbial World 12  
6 Viruses, Prions, and Viroids: Infectious Agents of Plants and Animals 13 #6: Antibiotic Sensitivity – Kirby Bauer Diffusion Test
Review for and take the Unit II Exam  
Unit Module Lecture topic Textbook reading HOL Laboratory Exercise
3. Microorganisms and Humans 7 The Innate Immune Response 14 #7: Biochemical Testing For Microbial Identification – Methyl Red, Voges-Proskauer, and Catalase
The Adaptive Immune Response 15  
8 Immunological Disorders 17 #8: Biochemical Testing For Microbial Identification – Carbohydrate Fermentation Testing
Applications of the Immune response 18  
9 Host-Microbe Interactions 16 #9: Bacterial Identification Through Functional Media – Motility Testing
Epidemiology 19  
10 Antimicrobial Medications 20 #10: Environmental Influences on Microbial Growth – Salt Tolerance and pH Testing

Review for and take the Unit III Exam

Complete your Unit 3 Discussion

 
4. Infectious Diseases 11 Respiratory Infections 21 #11: Fomite Transmission
Skin Infections 22  
12 Wound Infections 23

#12: Food Safety 

NOTE: In addition to completing the HOL lab itself, you will also write and submit a formal lab report for this exercise. See instructions located in UNIT 4 Week 12. This is a required assignment for Lab and must be completed in order to get access to Final Lab Exam.

Digestive System Infections 24  
13

Genitourinary Infections

[7th Ed.: CH. 25. Genitourinary Tract Infections]

27  
Nervous System Infections 26  
14

Blood and Lymphatic System Infections

[7th Ed.: CH. 28. HIV Disease and Complications of Immunodeficiency & CH. 27. Blood and Lymphatic Infections]

25 HOL Laboratory Final Exam: Prepare for the Laboratory Final Exam

Schedule your HOL Laboratory Final Exam with ProctorU (at least one week prior to taking the exam)

Review for and take the HOL Laboratory Final Exam

Review for and take the Unit IV Exam

Request the current pathogen list from your instructor for your Case Study!

5. Applied Microbiology 15

Microbial Ecology

[7th Ed.: CH. 29. Microbial Ecology]

28  

Environmental Microbiology

[7th Ed.: CH. 30. Environmental Microbiology]

29  

Food Microbiology

[7th Ed.: CH. 31. Food Microbiology]

30  
  16

Review for and take the Unit V Exam

Complete your Unit 5 Discussion

Submit your Case Study to both SafeAssign and Unit 5 within the course!

Schedule your Final Exam with ProctorU (at least one week prior to taking the exam)

Review for and take the Final Exam

 

Student Resources

The chapters assigned for reading in this course are for the 9th edition of the text. However, the corresponding lectures (videos and handouts) are from the 7th edition. The correspondence is clearly indicated and should not cause confusion. Please communicate with your instructor about any content-related questions you might have.

Student Portal: Your Best UNE Resource

We created the UNE Online Student Portal, specifically for you, to be a useful collection of information to support you as you navigate your online course(s).

From the UNE Online Student Portal, you can access:

  • Blackboard/Brightspace
  • Technical Support
  • Library
  • Bookstore
  • UNE Email
  • U-Online

The portal also features:

  • Dates to Remember
  • Support and Services
  • Contact information for your Support Specialist
  • Academic Resources - links to the Academic Calendar, Registrar and Academic Calendar
  • Financial - links to eBilling, Financial Aid and Student Accounts

Instructor and Support Contact Information

Check Blackboard/Brightspace for specific instructor and support specialist contact information.

Further Assistance

Your student service advisor monitors course progression and provides assistance or guidance when needed. They can assist questions regarding ordering course materials, University policies, billing, navigating the course in Blackboard/Brightspace, and more.

Student Lounge

The Student Lounge Discussion Board is a designated support forum in which students may engage with each other and grapple with course content. Feel free to post questions, seek clarification, and support each other, but be mindful of UNE's Academic Integrity Policy.

Your instructor will monitor this forum. However, if you are seeking specific and timely answers to questions about course content or your personal grades, please contact your instructor via course messages. For questions about course materials, program policy, and how to navigate and proceed through the course, please contact your Student Service Advisor through the Student Portal.

Accommodations

Any student who would like to request, or ask any questions regarding, academic adjustments or accommodations must contact the Student Access Center at (207) 221-4438 or pcstudentaccess@une.edu. Student Access Center staff will evaluate the student's documentation and determine eligibility of accommodation(s) through the Student Access Center registration procedure.

Policies

Proctored Examinations

The University of New England has contracted with ProctorU to provide students with the most convenient online exam proctoring system. This system provides a simple, no cost to the student, secure, online proctor for exams and allows the student to take all the exams at home and on their own schedule.

Upon enrollment into the course, each student will register with ProctorU and establish a login name and password. This will give the student access to all of ProctorU's services. When ready, students will schedule each of their proctored exams with ProctorU. Exams must be scheduled at least 72 hours in advance to avoid fees. Prior to taking their exams, students must be sure that they have downloaded the ProctorU Chrome or Firefox extension and are using the most current version of Chrome or Firefox. They must also be sure their testing site's connection meets the minimum requirements by using ProctorU's "Test It Out" utility.

Upon the exam day and hour, students will log in to ProctorU and click on "exams". After following the procedures outlined at ProctorU's web site, the student will log in to Blackboard/Brightspace and locate their correct exam. The proctor will then allow student access to that exam.

Students must use ProctorU and must follow all proctoring requirements for their exams to be credited.

Proctored exams are not available for review at any time. You will not be able to see the questions, nor the answers you've given, after completing the exams. Please contact your instructor for specific feedback.

Course Discussions

Discussion board assignments cover interesting current events or materials related to this course that contribute to a deeper understanding of key concepts and allow you to interact with your classmates and the instructor. Each assignment may require you to conduct internet research, read additional materials (a short journal or magazine article), visit a specific webpage, AND/OR view a short video prior to writing a response following the specific guidelines in the assignment.

To earn full credit: you will need to post a response to the discussion topic, respond to the original posts of at least two other students, and then contribute meaningfully to an ongoing discussion. You will need to post your initial response before you will see any posts from your classmates. Please keep in mind that only this initial response is included in your assignment grade, so make sure you have followed all of the guidelines and written a complete response prior to submitting the post. For special cases where one or two students are accelerating faster through the course, the instructor will participate in the discussion so that everyone has the opportunity to interact.

Please see Blackboard/Brightspace for a full description, along with specific guidelines, for each assignment. Discussion board assignments should be completed, along with all other assignments in the course, in the order that they appear. Due to the course design, you may be unable to take a proctored exam if you do not complete all assignments that appear prior to that exam.

Please also refer to the Grading Policy/Grade Breakdown section of the syllabus to learn the percentage of your grade that each discussion board assignment is worth.

Technology Requirements

Please review the technical requirements for UNE Online Graduate Programs: https://online.une.edu/online-learning/technical-requirements/

Course Length

A schedule of lectures and assignments is included in this syllabus. This is, however a self-paced course and you can complete the course in less time.

  1. Courses in the SPHP program are equivalent to one-semester courses designed to be completed in 16 weeks
  2. Enrollment in the course begins the day your section opens which is listed in the Academic Calendar found on the Student Success Portal.
  3. Course start and end dates are in respect to Eastern Time.

Withdrawal and Refund Policies

Please visit this page to review the withdrawal and refund policies.

Grade Policy

Students are expected to attempt and complete all graded assignments and proctored exams by the end date of the course. To view the incomplete grade policy, please click here.

Transcripts

Due to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, only the student may request official transcripts. This may be done online by going to the University of New England Registrar website and following the directions on the page.

To view your unofficial UNE student transcript:

  1. Log into uonline at https://uonline.une.edu
  2. Select Student Services
  3. Select Student Records
  4. Select Academic Transcript

To request your official UNE student transcript:

Please review your Unofficial Transcript prior to requesting an Official Transcript.

  1. Log into uonline at https://uonline.une.edu
  2. Select Student Services
  3. Select Student Records
  4. Select Request Printed/Official Transcript
  5. Follow the prompts

After you click Submit Request, your official transcript will be put into the queue to be printed in the Registrar’s Office.

Academic Integrity

The University of New England values academic integrity in all aspects of the educational experience. Academic dishonesty in any form undermines this standard and devalues the original contributions of others. It is the responsibility of all members of the University community to actively uphold the integrity of the academy; failure to act, for any reason, is not acceptable.

Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to the following:

  1. Cheating, copying, or the offering or receiving of unauthorized assistance or information.
  2. Fabrication or falsification of data, results, or sources for papers or reports.
  3. Action which destroys or alters the work of another student.
  4. Multiple submission of the same paper or report for assignments in more than one course without permission of each instructor.
  5. Plagiarism, the appropriation of records, research, materials, ideas, or the language of other persons or writers and the submission of them as one's own.

Charges of academic dishonesty will be reviewed by the Program Director. Penalties for students found responsible for violations may depend upon the seriousness and circumstances of the violation, the degree of premeditation involved, and/or the student’s previous record of violations. Appeal of a decision may be made to the Dean whose decision will be final. Student appeals will take place through the grievance process outlined in the student handbook.